Rust, Stem, Stripe , or Leaf. Do you have it?

Most new southern varieties are Rust resistant.

Now we have that out of the way – what is in your field?

Compare the wheat you planted against the UGA 2014 wheat chart. This resource will help you in determining what could be in your wheat.

Rust. Please check using a white cloth to see if you can rub off any spores. The colors to look for are red/brown, yellow, orange, or any combination. (See LSU chart below.) Wait two days after a rain to do this as rain will wash off the spores. Rust is very aggressive when the temperatures are right and must be controlled quickly. Do not allow many days to pass before you check your fields. Call me if you find Rust on a AGS variety. 

Stripe Rust, LSU

Stripe Rust, vis LSU

Powdery Mildew and BYD (Barley Yellow Dwarf). Look for white to gray powdery fungal growth on leaves and leaf sheaths. Tip yellowing, purple leaves, and/or twisting of leaves are symptoms of BYD, which is a virus, and fungicides will not control it. You must put something out to control aphids before you get the virus. See LSU info on BYD below.

BYD (Barley Yellow Dwarf, LSU)

BYD (Barley Yellow Dwarf)

Cold/Frost Damage. You could just have cold/frost damaged wheat. The conditions have been right cold-frost damage, and some early planted field have it.  Yellowing, streaking, tip burn,  and purple tips are caused by frost/cold damage.

Manganese Deficiency. Manganese is another problem in fields with HIGH Ph. The photo is of a confirmed manganese deficient field.

Manganese Deficient field.

Manganese Deficient field.

I generally find the flag leaf to be the one of the things I want to protect, along with the wheat head. Leaf Blotch, Fusarium, and Glume Blotch must be controlled to have good wheat yields. Fungicides do not trans-locate well and need to be on the surface they are to protect. Please wait as long as possible or if you must spray early then plan to spray twice.

Tissue test your flag leaf. Do not get the largest tiller in each plant, as it will get the first choice of N and give you a skewed reading. I prefer to ample from one of the smaller tillers because that is where your yield will be increased. These smaller /later tillers will dry-up if you do not have proper fertilization.

Good Growing!

*Information obtained from 2015 Georgia Pest Control Handbook (http//www.caes.uga.edu/publications) , Intensive Wheat Management in Georgia, and LSU. As always, follow label and dispose of empties properly.

Wheat/Oat update

Most wheat/oats are 4 inches (three or more tillers) tall or taller and you need to put out your winter weed control. I really prefer by ground but, it is wet. If you put out by air PLEASE try to use 3-5 gal per acre, for coverage down in the canopy. Edges can really be a problem and windy days cannot give you coverage you need.

Weed Control
Harmony Extra SC plus MCPA – per label, always add surfactant per label.

Express Plus MCPA – per label, always add surfactant per label. Gives good to excellent control on most winter weeds. DO NOT USE THIS ON OATS.

POWERFLEX and Others – per label, gives excellent weed and ryegrass control. Read label for plant back restrictions.

Good Growing!

** Information obtained from 2014 Georgia Pest Control Handbook and Intensive Wheat Management in Georgia. As always follow label and dispose of empties properly.

Wheat/Oat Update

If your wheat/oats are 4 inches (three or more tillers) tall or taller then you may need to put out your winter weed control. The weeds have really been growing because of the warm weather, and also can really hurt your yields. Chemical prices are up this year so please don’t cut out application because of the price, it will pay to control the weeds.

Take time to walk your wheat fields while the wheat is still young and you can count the plants per foot of row. If you find a row that is too thin or too thick flag that row on your drill and correct the seeding rate before you plant next year. A count of 18-20 plants per foot (7-8 inch row) is great, 25-30 is way too thick.

Weed Control
(See Small Grains 2014 from UGA)

Harmony Extra SC, per label always add surfactant per label.

Express Plus MCPA, per label always add surfactant per label. Gives good to excellent control on most winter weeds. DO NOT USE THIS ON OATS.

POWERFLEX and others, per label gives excellent weed and ryegrass control. Read label for plant back restrictions.

Good Growing!

** Information obtained from 2014 Georgia Pest Control Handbook and Intensive Wheat Management in Georgia. As always follow label and dispose of empties properly.

High Yield Wheat Management

  1. Collect samples for soil testing. Add lime, P, K, minor, and micro elements as called for by soil test interpretations. Use yield of 80 bu/acre on lab sheet. Deep till, then prepare a good seed bed prior to seeding, keep field traffic to a minimum at this time. Do not plant on a fluffy seed bed. No-til will work if drill is set properly and the ground has been deep tilled in the spring, a deep fall tillage is best. Paratill or Terra-Max can be used with very little disturbance to the surface residue for a fall tillage.
  1. Plant at a rate of 1,350,000 to 1,500,000 seed per acre (a wheat with 12,500 seed per pound will be 120 pounds of seed per acre the 1,500,000 seeding rate) or 32 to 44 seeds/sq. ft. or 18 to 28 seed/ft. of row in 7 to 8-inch row spacing or 8 to 14 seeds/ft. of row in 4-inch rows. Best planting depth is ¾ to less than 1.5 inches deep. PLEASE TREAT YOUR PLANTING SEED, THIS SHOULD GIVE YOU OVER 90% GERM AND A MUCH BETTER STAND. Insecticide plus funcicide treated seed are best (even if you are planting a fly resistance variety) or a timley fall spray for the control aphids which vector barley yellow dwarf.
  1. Apply for the crop year a total of 95 to 135 lb N. per acre plus a total of 30 lbs of sulfur per acre. Three applications is the best but less will work, 25 to 45 lbs N/acre at planting (behind cotton or corn 40 to 45 lbs of N), 40 to 60 lbs/acre 15 to 30 days prior to jointing (1-15- to 2-10-) , and 20 to 30 lbs/acre at first joint stage (3-01- to 3-20-). This is for following peanuts, high residue crops may require more nitrogen. Cotton needs be considered a high residue crop. Some varities need less Nitrogen to make the same yields please do not over apply N. 
  1. Use a Spring fungicide on all varieties. A spray of approved fungicide on the last day of application (at full heading or per label) is most important to help control glume blotch. Glume blotch hurts yields on the wheat heads, most funcicides do not translocate very well.
  1. Know the weed history of the site and identify weeds as soon as possible. On all seed fields you must use herbicides to control such weeds as wild radish, mustard, turnips, wild onion, garlic, and primrose. Several good chemicals will help control ryegrass, if it is a problem. All ryegrass chemicals work best if ryegrass has two or less (pinning) tillers, this could be in mid December on 11-15- planted wheat or (21-28 days after planting).

Good Growing

Soybean Grower Update

A good fungicide has proven to give a yield increase of 6-8 bu per acre over non-treated soybeans in university test. One spray per season is usally enough. To control velvetbean caterpillar and make loopers and stink bugs less of a pest add Dimlin. This year appears to be a very bad stink bug/Kudzu bug year. Look close at your fields cotton, peanut, and soybean especially if they are close to a harvested corn field because there has been several generations in your corn already. Soybeans planted in early-mid June are now in R3. ( R-3 = Pods at least 3/16 inch on the fourth node from top of plant ) You lose some effectiveness if you apply too early. If you have stink bugs think about putting in some pesticide. Watch for Kudzu bugs I have found them in every field.   For Information go to : http://www.kudzubug.org/grower.html

Good fungicide**

Plus

   Dimlin + 1.2 lbs of solubor per acre

Plus

Acephate (Orthene), Karate , Brigade , etc.

**Pesticide information obtained from Georgia Pest Control Handbook @ http://www.ent.uga.edu/pmh/.    

              

As always follow label and dispose of empties properly.

Good Growing!

 

 

Soybean Update

May planted growers need to check their fields for insects NOW. Three cornered Alfalfa Hoppers are really out in force along with the Kudzu bug. See picture of damage by Three Cornered Alfalfa  Hopper below. Often the stem will just break with wind or just walking through the field.

Kudzu bugs -2

Kudzu Bugs

3 cornered

3 Cornered Alfalfa Hoppers

Here are two very good sites for more information on Kudzu bugs:

Late Planting 

Please put 40-50 lbs. of N out following corn for best yields; plant with a drill on 7 in centers. AGS 5911 LL is a very good late planted bean and has Liberty tolerance. 

Good Growing!

*Some information obtained from 2014 Georgia Pest Control Handbook,                       Soybean Diagnostic Guide, and Dupont.

*** As always follow label and dispose of empties properly.

Soybean Update

Growers need to check their fields for insects NOW. Three cornered Alfalfa Hoppers are really out in full force along with the Kudzu bug. See picture of damage by Three Cornered Alfalfa Hopper and roots forming at damage site. Often the stem will just break with wind or just by walking through the field.

Three Cornered Alfalfa Hopper

Three Cornered Alfalfa Hopper

 

Three Cornered Alfalfa Hopper

Three Cornered Alfalfa Hopper

Late Planting

AGS 5911 LL is a very good late planted bean and has Liberty tolerance.

There are several group 5, 6, 7, and 8 group beans that have yielded very well planted late. You can read about Ultra Late Planting for details here on the blog.

Always follow label directions and wash all empties completely.

Good Growing!

*Some information obtained from 2014 Georgia Pest Control Handbook,                       Soybean Diagnostic Guide, and Dupont.

*** As always follow label and dispose of empties properly.

 

 

 

 

Soybean Update

Seeding rate  is one of the first steps toward a good yield. Soybeans have from 2200 seed per lb to 4500 seed per lb.  Do not go by pounds per acre .  30” rows at 8 seed per foot will use  59 pounds per acre of a 2250 seed/lb soybean and only 41.4 pounds per acre of a 3600 seed/lb soybean.  You want about 145,000 seed per acre for normal planting dates.

SEEDING RATE
36” rows  9-10 seed per foot
30” rows  8- 9 seed per foot
21 to 24” rows  6- 7 seed per foot
15 to 16” rows  5- 6 seed per foot
7 ½  to 8” rows  3- 4 seed per foot
Twin peanut type rows  5-7 seed  per foot

LATE PLANTING If you are planning to plant after June 30 please order your beans now and ask your dealer to advise your seedsman to place these late planted beans in cool storage. This will maximize your chance of getting high germing soybeans for your late planting needs. There are several group 5, 6, and 7 group beans that have yielded very well planted late. Always follow label directions and  wash all empties completely.

AGS 828 RR #1  2year adveragePlains @ 81.3 bu/acre  Group 7 & 8

AGS 5911 LL  # 4  2year adverage @Tifton 57.2 bu/acre Group 5

AGS Woodruff  # 3 2 year adverage Tifton @70.8 Bu/acre Group 7 & 8

Good Growing!

*Some information obtained from 2014 Georgia Pest Control Handbook,Soybean Diagnostic Guide, and Dupont.
*** As always follow label and dispose of empties properly.

Yellow Wheat – Leachable Nutrients

Good advice from NCState and Randy Weisz.

To Folks With Small Grain Interests
Fr Randy Weisz – Small Grains Specialist @ NCSU

Areas of yellowing wheat are showing up in fields across North Carolina… from the Piedmont to the Tidewater. With all the rain we’ve had it is likely that most of these problems are related to a deficiency in leachable nutrients with S being the most likely culprit. K and N may also be suspects! A sulfur problem will usually result in the upper younger leaves turning yellow in contrast to a N problem that results in yellow lower – older leaves.

Should remedial fertilizer applications be made now? There is probably no 100% correct answer to that question. The closer we get to heading, the less likely fertilizer applications are to result in yield benefits. However, if the crop is suffering from nutrient deficiencies, and is somewhere between early jointing and early boot stage, it seems logical and preferable to do something to green it back up!

What options are there? A diagnostic tissue sample from the yellow and green areas is always a good idea! Most of the phone calls I’ve had so far have been S problems, and the most common prescription has been granular ammonium sulfate. Other granular options are possible as well for turning a S problem around. If the problem is related to a micronutrient, a tissue test will help to determine that.

Remember that liquid fertilizers such as UAN or 24S applied after jointing can burn the leaves and developing grain head inside the stem. For that reason these forms of liquid N or S are generally not applied at this growth stage. Tank-mixing UAN or 24S liquid fertilizers with fungicides and/or insecticides can in some cases make this burn worse. So, dry fertilizer is the safest option.